Russia has shown only a few cyber capabilities, but the US has a quantum computing response to possible threats

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Russia hasn’t shown its full cyber warfare capabilities, but the United States should remain confident in its own cyber defense, experts told Fox News Digital.

“I think the concern is that they may have capabilities that we don’t know about,” said Matt Stamford, cybersecurity expert and founder of OccamSec. “And until they need to use them, we may never know.”

Much of the conversation regarding Russia’s invasion of Ukraine naturally focused on the physical siege and assault on kyiv, Mariupol and other cities, but cyber warfare began before Russian troops never set foot in Ukraine.

RUSSIA INVADES UKRAINE: LIVE UPDATES

The country suffered a number of hacks in the days leading up to Russia’s invasion, with cybersecurity firm ESET discovering a “data erasure program” that affected hundreds of machines just a week before the attack. ‘invasion. Since the start of the invasion, the hacking collective Anonymous has declared war on Russia, and Ukraine continues to suffer cyberattacks from Russian agents.

But the extent of Russia’s capabilities remains a mystery since their targets do not operate at the same technological level.

“The thing is, if I don’t need to use my last and greatest attack, why should I?” Stamford explained. “I don’t need to do something new when I can just do something old that works great.”

The concern lies in the nature of cyber warfare itself: unlike conventional weapons which can be damaged and destroyed after use, a cyber weapon – such as data erasing programs or viruses – can be reproduced, reused and spread.

“If you look back at things like the WannaCry and NotPetya events…the bad guys took them, modified them and sent them back to you, then we get into this dangerous situation where if Russia decides to use something that we don’t ‘Haven’t seen before, someone else would definitely pick it up, research it, split up, figure out what they could do with it,’ Stamford said.

JOURNALIST’S NOTEBOOK: RUSSIAN TV HOST SEES ‘EMPTY PLANET’ IF UKRAINE-RUSSIA WAR GOES NUCLEAR

The issue is complicated by the fact that Moscow appears to be operating with a model that gives free rein to individual operators to attack foreign targets without explicit government instruction or recognition.

The E. Russian hacker whom the local police arrested. Putin also recently signed an initiative to bolster Russia’s cyber defenses, which former defense official James Anderson says could be a way to further entangle the country’s state-owned and commercial enterprises.

“The public effort to ban Russia from using cybersecurity tools from ‘hostile countries’ appears, at least in part, to be a face-saving measure, since many major Western tech companies have already pulled out of the Russian market in response to Moscow’s brutal invasion of Ukraine,” Anderson explained. “In addition to helping Russia better protect itself from hackers, the cybersecurity decree likely reflects the will of Putin to further extend his authoritarian tentacles, as state corporations and other strategically important enterprises will be required to provide state security services with “unfettered access to sources of information.”

BIDEN TO SIGN EXECUTIVE ORDER AND NATIONAL SECURITY MEMO TO ADVANCE QUANTUM TECHNOLOGIES

But the United States must remain confident in its ability to defend itself against attacks from foreign actors, especially with the implementation of quantum computing, according to Martin Moore, retired special forces sergeant major and owner of ZeroOneAngus LLC.

“I think quantum computing and post-quantum encryption is better than relying on a firewall to protect us — that’s a higher priority,” Moore said. “A firewall can only protect traffic and data leaks. We need protection and systems that don’t have built-in back and side doors.”

Quantum computing simply increases the already incredible number of calculations a machine could perform, going through “a million keys” in a matter of moments.

ISRAEL’S AX ​​ATTACK LEAVES SEVERAL INJURED IN SUBURBS OF TEL AVIV EL’AD

The United States may not provide a national firewall as Russia and China wanted, but companies and government agencies can start wrapping quantum encryption around what is already largely “robust” encryption. used. The Department of Homeland Security leads the national effort to improve cybersecurity through the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).

Moore attributes the US companies’ success to their approach, which assumes that companies and users operate in a “zero trust environment”.

“We know everything is vulnerable and always will be and we have to stay ahead of the game, and it’s hard to stay ahead when there are so many variables at play,” Moore said. “So I think developing a system that can’t be penetrated will be next to impossible.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“We need to try harder to understand the threat and the potential threat and do something because we think that even though we think we are safe, we are not,” he added. “You can never know, and we should treat everything as if it were a ‘Zero Trust’ environment.”

Sherry J. Basler