Launch of “Hollywood on the Spectrum” photo series and website

As part of Autism Appreciation Month, photographer Beth Dubber announces the launch of a photo series focusing on neurodiversity in the entertainment industry to profile actors who are on the spectrum and how they is making notable strides in the world of film, TV, and streaming. The series of photos “Hollywood on the Spectrum“, features both working actors as well as up-and-coming talents hoping to break into Hollywood. This is a series of photographic portraits featuring actors and musicians who are part of the spectrum. including interviews with the actors who discuss the challenges and successes in the strata of Hollywood.The website is now live.

“Having worked as a still photographer for over 15 years, I was compelled to create this photo series after working with a talented group of actors from The Miracle Project who were on the autism spectrum. as an ally, my hope is to leverage my talents and connections in the industry to continue to raise awareness and help reframe the conversation around diverse casting in Hollywood, providing a new visual platform to grab attention and hear the band in their own words,” said Beth Dubber, author and photographer on this project. www.bethdubber.com

Musician and actor, Aiden Boyer added, “As someone on the autism spectrum, I crave community because I was unintentionally deprived of it growing up. This project has given me and to my colleagues, a platform to be ourselves without shame, and allowed us to be part of this amazing community, on such a beautiful day that I will remember all my life.”

Learn more about the campaign and the actors here at www.hollywoodonthespectrum.com.

Film and television have a profound ability to influence our lives, and one of the most powerful demonstrations of this is the phrase “representation matters”. When someone from a historically underrepresented group sees themselves on screen, it can be transformational for them and for society. Until recently, portrayals of the autism spectrum were rare, and when such characters did appear, they were mostly played by neurotypical actors, for example, the best known being the role of Dustin Hoffman in Rainman.

Elaine Room, consultant for this project, said: “I am proud to be part of this groundbreaking project, which celebrates those of us who experience the world differently. The kindness, respect and exposure that Hollywood on the Spectrum provides can change the lives of these most underrepresented talented actors.” Elaine is a television and film access consultant, founder of The Miracle Project (www.themiracleproject.org) and co-founder of the 1IN4 Coalition (www.1in4coalition.org).

Pictured: LR Mona Heathcoate, Ana Sharp, Dylan Kiedman.

Photo credits: Beth Dubber, Hollywood on the Spectrum.

Sherry J. Basler